Connect with us

Real Estate

Trump, lawmakers agree to end government shutdown without border wall funding

Editor

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump agreed under mounting pressure on Friday to end a 35-day-old partial government shutdown without getting the money he had demanded from Congress for a border wall.

A three-week stopgap spending plan, passed unanimously by both the Senate and to the House of Representatives, now sets up tough talks with lawmakers about how to address security along the U.S.-Mexican border, with Democrats appearing unyielding in their opposition to Trump’s wall.

With polls showing most Americans blamed Trump for the painful shutdown — the longest of its kind in U.S. history — the president embraced a way out of the crisis that Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had been pushing for weeks.

But the Republican president vowed the shutdown would resume on Feb. 15 if he is dissatisfied with the results of the border security talks, or he would declare a national emergency to get the wall money.

With the effects of the shutdown spreading, Trump signed the stopgap spending measure on Friday, after it passed unanimously in both the Republican-led Senate and the Democratic-led House.

The shutdown, which pitted Pelosi against Trump, was her first test since assuming the Speaker post three weeks ago, and she drew praise from fellow Democrats for what they said was an outmanoeuvring of the president.

After Trump announced the agreement, top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer said he hoped the experience would be a “lesson learned” for Trump and his party that it is self-defeating to shut down the government over policy disputes.

“I am very proud to announce today that we have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government,” Trump — who days earlier had insisted “We will not Cave!” — said in the White House Rose Garden.

A lapse in funding shuttered about a quarter of federal agencies, with about 800,000 workers either furloughed or required to work without pay. Many employees as well as contractors were turning to unemployment assistance, food banks and other support. Others began seeking new jobs.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, left, and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer are seen at a news conference on Capitol Hill on Friday. Pelosi drew praise from fellow Democrats for what they said was an outmanoeuvring of the president. (Andrew Harnik/Associated Press)

Trump said he would act to ensure federal workers get their back pay “as soon as possible.”

Trump had previously demanded the inclusion of $5.7 billion US to help pay for a border wall — one of his signature campaign promises — in any legislation to fund government agencies, but Democrats had blocked him.

An administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said stories of law enforcement officials not being able to do their jobs at full capacity helped convince Trump to agree to a short-term solution to reopen the government. The official said the White House ultimately would accept a deal with lawmakers if it includes wall funding, even if it is less than $5.7 billion.

The agreement requires passage in the House and Senate and Trump’s signature. Trump said a bipartisan congressional conference committee will meet to come up with a plan for border security. Schumer said Democrats and Trump have “so many areas” on which they can agree on border security but not a wall.

Trump mulls using emergency powers

Trump says the U.S. has no choice but to build a “powerful wall or steel barrier” along the border with Mexico. 

“If we don’t get a fair deal from Congress, the government will either shut down on Feb. 15 — again — or I would use the powers afforded to me under the laws and the Constitution of the United States to address this emergency.”

Port of Seattle workers carry items donated to federal workers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on Friday. With about 800,000 workers either furloughed or required to work without pay, many federal employees as well as contractors were turning to unemployment assistance, food banks and other support. (Ted S. Warren/Associated Press)

He had previously indicated he was considering an emergency declaration to circumvent congressional funding powers if lawmakers refused to fund his wall, an action that almost certainly would be swiftly challenged by Democrats as exceeding his authority under the U.S. Constitution.

Trump triggered the shutdown, which began on Dec. 22, with his hard-line wall-funding demand. The Democrats rejected it on the grounds that a wall would be costly, ineffective and immoral. Trump has said it is necessary to curb illegal immigration and drug trafficking.

“The walls we are building are not medieval walls. They are smart walls designed to meet the needs of front-line border agents and are operationally effective,” he said. “These barriers are made of steel, have see-through visibility, which is very important, and are equipped with sensors, monitors and cutting-edge technology, including state-of-the-art drones.”

Members of unions, federal workers and contractors hold a rally at Airport Circle in Egg Harbor Township, N.J., on Friday. Some federal agencies have reported much higher absence rates among workers as they face an indefinite wait for their next paychecks. (Edward Lea/The Press of Atlantic City via AP)

Pelosi said she would discuss with Trump “a mutually agreed date” for his annual state of the union address, which she had effectively forced him to postpone amid the shutdown showdown. A senior White House official said the speech will not be on Tuesday, as it had originally been planned, and that it is up to Pelosi to reschedule it.

The temporary funding bill would extend agency funding at the last fiscal year’s levels and would include some money for border security — but not a wall, which Trump had initially said would be paid for by Mexico.

In one of the many effects of the shutdown, hundreds of flights were grounded or delayed at airports in the New York area and Philadelphia on Friday as more air-traffic controllers called in sick. Some federal agencies have reported much higher absence rates among workers as they face an indefinite wait for their next paychecks.

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Real Estate

Montreal real-estate prices climbing much faster than Toronto or Vancouver: study

Editor

Published

on

By

MONTREAL — The cost of housing per square foot has skyrocketed in Montreal while other cities saw little change over the last year, according to a new national survey.

The study found that condominium prices in downtown Montreal are up 13.5 per cent from last year to, on average, $805 per square foot.

That’s not as high as other cities, but it’s catching up — and Montreal’s rate of growth is outpacing other major Canadian cities.

Toronto’s condo prices grew to $1083 per square foot, an increase of just under 10 per cent, according to the study. In Vancouver, where you can find some of Canada’s most expensive condo prices, rates are down 4 per cent to $1192 per square foot.

To make the comparisons, Canadian real estate giant Century 21 collected data from real estate boards across the country to calculate the home costs per square foot.

“It’s important to compare apple to apples,” said Todd Shyiak, the company’s vice president of operations.

Montreal’s rise was even more explosive for detached homes and townhouses.

Detached houses in Montreal’s downtown and southwest rose to $958 per square foot, 40 per cent up from last year.

“It’s wild,” said Century 21 broker Angela Langtry. She says the pandemic raised demand.

“People had a lot of time to figure out they don’t like the home they’re in,” she said. “They all want pools.”

There was a big spike in sales, she noted, following a pause in brokerage during the spring, at the peak of the pandemic.

Experts say the pandemic will push people into the suburbs as they search for affordable housing and home office space.

“A huge portion of our society’s housing needs changed overnight,” said Shyiak. People “no longer need to be 10 minutes from the office.”

He says that could mean less demand for condos in the future. “People want their own front door,” he said.

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Carttera buys prime downtown Montreal development site

Editor

Published

on

By

Carttera has acquired a prime downtown Montreal site at 1455 De La Montagne St. which will mark its third development on the thoroughfare.

“We think it’s probably one of the best, if not the best, locations in the whole city,” Carttera founding partner Jim Tadeson told RENX. “We’ve had great success on De La Montagne.”

The two earlier projects are: L’Avenue, a building with 393 residential units, 84,000 square feet of office space and 34,000 square feet of retail that was developed with Broccolini and occupied in 2017; and Arbora Residences, a two-phase development with 434 rental and condominium units in three buildings being built in partnership with Oxford Properties.

Thursday’s latest acquisition, for $48.5 million from 630745 Ontario, is a 31,750-square-foot surface parking lot with flexible mixed-use zoning on the corner of De La Montagne and De Maisonneuve Boulevard West.

The site is near the Vogue Hotel Montreal Downtown, the new Four Seasons Hotel Montreal and high-end retail.

“It’s zoned for up to 203,000 square feet of density, which we’re going to take advantage of,” said Tadeson. “Our vision for the site is a condominium project with some retail.”

Since there is no demolition required and no heritage issues to contend with, Toronto-based Carttera plans to move ahead quickly with the luxury project.

It’s in the concept design phase and Tadeson said it could take six months or more before it’s prepared to make a submission to the city.

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Montreal Has the Hottest Real Estate Market in Canada Right Now

Editor

Published

on

By

If you thought Toronto’s real estate market was on fire, it’s time for a second take, because the market in Montreal is the hottest in all of Canada right now.

A newly-released annual report from CENTURY 21 Canada reveals that, following an early-spring decline due to the COVID-19 pandemic, sales numbers are bouncing back and house prices across the country are maintaining their strength. The study compared the price per square foot of properties sold between January 1 and June 30 of this year, compared to the same period last year.

In Toronto and Vancouver, unsurprisingly, prices remain high. But while regions across the country are seeing varied stories when it comes to their housing market fluctuations, Montreal stands out — there, prices have increased dramatically since 2019. While the numbers remain lower than Toronto and Vancouver, that housing market is proving to be the country’s strongest right now.

In Quebec’s largest city, prices have increased significantly since last year, particularly in the downtown detached house and townhouse markets. For example, the price of a detached house in Montreal’s downtown and southwest rose 42.14% to $958 per square foot, while townhouses went up 44% to $768, and condos, 13.55% to $805. Comparatively, in Toronto and Vancouver, prices saw more modest increases or, in some cases, even declines.

“Even though real estate in Quebec was not considered an essential service, we have seen strong demand and a jump in prices in 2020,” said Mohamad Al-Hajj, owner of CENTURY 21 Immo-Plus in Montreal.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending