Connect with us

Real Estate

For the love of eel: N.L. company developing new product for international market

Editor

Published

on

For years North Atlantic Aquaponics has been shipping live eels to markets in Korea and Ontario, but now they’re working to take their products to a tasty new level. 

The company, which started on the west coast community of Robinsons, is collaborating with the Functional Foods Laboratory at MUN’s Grenfell Campus in Corner Brook to test and develop a new recipe for kabayaki eel. 

“Kabayaki is just barbecued or grilled eel with a specific type of sauce,” said facilities manager Justin Stacey. 

“We’re doing different testing and analytics of the eel itself to find the best way to keep and maintain the most nutritional value that we can. On top of that, we’re trying to find the best tasting, best esthetically pleasing, all the variables that go into developing a product like this. And with MUN’s facility, we got it all here.”

Justin Stacey, facilities manager with North Atlantic Aquaponics, was on hand at Grenfell to oversee product testing. (Jennifer Grudic/CBC)

There is a stigma attached to it, so when you approach a market in Newfoundland or in Canada in general, we kind of have to calibrate our approach.– Justin Stacey

The Functional Foods Laboratory, under the direction of Dr. Raymond Thomas, allows students from a variety to backgrounds to test, analyze and develop food products.

This week the public was asked to take part in a tasting experiment that got them to rate and rank four different kabayaki samples based on things like appearance, flavour and texture.

Graduate student Melissa Hamilton is overseeing the project. (Jennifer Grudic/CBC)

The survey involved groups of people, 10 at a time, given sample plates through a small door and then asked to answer questions on the computer in front of them. 

Science meets product development

Graduate student Melissa Hamilton is leading the project, which she says incorporates elements of both psychology and chemical analysis, as well as real-world practicality. Once the consumer testing is complete, they’ll be able to provide North Atlantic Aquaponics with information to help them develop their product. 

The lab can accommodate 10 testers at a time, each with their own computers to answer survey questions. (Jennifer Grudic/CBC)

“Let’s say that the consumers say the product is a bit too salty, then we’ll have to make an adjustment in that regard. Or say they like a certain packaging, because that’s one of the options as well, then we’ll use the one our participants are leaning towards,” said Hamilton.

She said the lab is ideal Corner Brook’s campus attracts people from different demographics.

“So it’s the ideal place to conduct this type of survey to get people from all over the world and get their perception of the food we’re trying to develop.”

Changing attitudes

If everything goes according to plan, Stacey said, they hope to soon be shipping their new kabayaki product to markets in Korea and Ontario. 

One of the biggest obstables, however, is attitudes about the product here at home. 

Grenfell’s Functional Foods Sensory Laboratory is designed in such a way that test participants can be served food straight from the test kitchen through a small door. (Jennifer Grudic/CBC)

“I know my grandfather fished and ate eel. It was part of the culture and part of his lifestyle. Now, to talk to my friends and people my age, there are very few that have eaten eel,” said Stacey.

“There is a stigma attached to it, so when you approach a market in Newfoundland or in Canada in general, we kind of have to calibrate our approach.” 

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Real Estate

Montreal real-estate prices climbing much faster than Toronto or Vancouver: study

Editor

Published

on

By

MONTREAL — The cost of housing per square foot has skyrocketed in Montreal while other cities saw little change over the last year, according to a new national survey.

The study found that condominium prices in downtown Montreal are up 13.5 per cent from last year to, on average, $805 per square foot.

That’s not as high as other cities, but it’s catching up — and Montreal’s rate of growth is outpacing other major Canadian cities.

Toronto’s condo prices grew to $1083 per square foot, an increase of just under 10 per cent, according to the study. In Vancouver, where you can find some of Canada’s most expensive condo prices, rates are down 4 per cent to $1192 per square foot.

To make the comparisons, Canadian real estate giant Century 21 collected data from real estate boards across the country to calculate the home costs per square foot.

“It’s important to compare apple to apples,” said Todd Shyiak, the company’s vice president of operations.

Montreal’s rise was even more explosive for detached homes and townhouses.

Detached houses in Montreal’s downtown and southwest rose to $958 per square foot, 40 per cent up from last year.

“It’s wild,” said Century 21 broker Angela Langtry. She says the pandemic raised demand.

“People had a lot of time to figure out they don’t like the home they’re in,” she said. “They all want pools.”

There was a big spike in sales, she noted, following a pause in brokerage during the spring, at the peak of the pandemic.

Experts say the pandemic will push people into the suburbs as they search for affordable housing and home office space.

“A huge portion of our society’s housing needs changed overnight,” said Shyiak. People “no longer need to be 10 minutes from the office.”

He says that could mean less demand for condos in the future. “People want their own front door,” he said.

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Carttera buys prime downtown Montreal development site

Editor

Published

on

By

Carttera has acquired a prime downtown Montreal site at 1455 De La Montagne St. which will mark its third development on the thoroughfare.

“We think it’s probably one of the best, if not the best, locations in the whole city,” Carttera founding partner Jim Tadeson told RENX. “We’ve had great success on De La Montagne.”

The two earlier projects are: L’Avenue, a building with 393 residential units, 84,000 square feet of office space and 34,000 square feet of retail that was developed with Broccolini and occupied in 2017; and Arbora Residences, a two-phase development with 434 rental and condominium units in three buildings being built in partnership with Oxford Properties.

Thursday’s latest acquisition, for $48.5 million from 630745 Ontario, is a 31,750-square-foot surface parking lot with flexible mixed-use zoning on the corner of De La Montagne and De Maisonneuve Boulevard West.

The site is near the Vogue Hotel Montreal Downtown, the new Four Seasons Hotel Montreal and high-end retail.

“It’s zoned for up to 203,000 square feet of density, which we’re going to take advantage of,” said Tadeson. “Our vision for the site is a condominium project with some retail.”

Since there is no demolition required and no heritage issues to contend with, Toronto-based Carttera plans to move ahead quickly with the luxury project.

It’s in the concept design phase and Tadeson said it could take six months or more before it’s prepared to make a submission to the city.

Continue Reading

Real Estate

Montreal Has the Hottest Real Estate Market in Canada Right Now

Editor

Published

on

By

If you thought Toronto’s real estate market was on fire, it’s time for a second take, because the market in Montreal is the hottest in all of Canada right now.

A newly-released annual report from CENTURY 21 Canada reveals that, following an early-spring decline due to the COVID-19 pandemic, sales numbers are bouncing back and house prices across the country are maintaining their strength. The study compared the price per square foot of properties sold between January 1 and June 30 of this year, compared to the same period last year.

In Toronto and Vancouver, unsurprisingly, prices remain high. But while regions across the country are seeing varied stories when it comes to their housing market fluctuations, Montreal stands out — there, prices have increased dramatically since 2019. While the numbers remain lower than Toronto and Vancouver, that housing market is proving to be the country’s strongest right now.

In Quebec’s largest city, prices have increased significantly since last year, particularly in the downtown detached house and townhouse markets. For example, the price of a detached house in Montreal’s downtown and southwest rose 42.14% to $958 per square foot, while townhouses went up 44% to $768, and condos, 13.55% to $805. Comparatively, in Toronto and Vancouver, prices saw more modest increases or, in some cases, even declines.

“Even though real estate in Quebec was not considered an essential service, we have seen strong demand and a jump in prices in 2020,” said Mohamad Al-Hajj, owner of CENTURY 21 Immo-Plus in Montreal.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending