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Here’s How My Boyfriend And I Live In A New City Every Single Month

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If you live in New York City for long enough, you have those moments where you imagine what it would be like to live somewhere else ― somewhere where the weather isn’t so cold, and the main method of transportation doesn’t reek of urine and trash, somewhere you could have a room that fits more than just a full-size bed and a vertical dresser.

Every year, for the past six years, on Aug. 1, I’ve reluctantly signed on the dotted line of the lease renewal for the New York City apartment I’ve unpacked my stuff in for quite some time, agreeing to pay an exorbitant amount of rent for a depressing amount of space. But this last August, I had been dating my boyfriend for close to a year-and-a-half, and we had decided to take the next step in our millennial relationship, meaning sharing more than just a Netflix account.

One afternoon, after talking out loud about how it would be nice to spend a year living somewhere other than the madness of Manhattan, we came to the realization that turned us into modern-day nomads: If we didn’t have a lease anywhere, we could afford to live in a new city every single month.

Since we both have the incredible privilege to work for ourselves, the only requirements were that the city has good public transportation (we don’t own a car and renting one isn’t cheap) and that we could find a place to live that cost less than what we both paid in rent in New York City (around $1,500 a piece).

And just like that, we flipped our plan of choosing just one city to park ourselves in for a year, to choosing an unlimited amount.

The first step to making this happen was to make sure that we could travel lightly. We decided to sell, give away or donate close to 90 percent of our belongings. We left a few garbage bags of clothes, personal items and a few pieces of furniture at my boyfriend’s parents’ house, which is located nearby in New Jersey. We then packed only enough clothes for our adventure, fitting them into one carry-on suitcase and one checked bag each.

For the past year and four months, we’ve lived in a new city almost every month, staying some places longer because we loved living there so much. We’ve lived in cities like Portland, Austin, Denver, Chicago, Los Angeles and in a few different neighborhoods in NYC (like Bed-Stuy, Greenpoint and Hell’s Kitchen). Here are the five main ways I’ve been able to live in a new city almost every month, without blowing my savings account or putting an end to my career.

Adam and I at our first stop: Portland. We hiked for the first time in our lives.


Photo Courtesy of Jen Glantz

Adam and I at our first stop: Portland. We hiked for the first time in our lives.

Take Over Someone’s Apartment

One of the main logistics we had to figure out when city-hopping was where we would live. Over the past year, we’ve lived in over 11 different apartments, sleeping in other people’s beds, using the contents left inside of their fridge, and crossing our fingers that we wouldn’t find any unwanted house guests roaming around, like roaches or rats.

No matter how many times you enter someone else’s home, there’s still a period of three to four days where you just feel like you’re a guest. However, after those days, you adapt. The fun thing is, you get to not only see how other people live, but you get to live like them, which isn’t something most of us do. Most of us build our own habits and cling to them for life.

After picking a city to live in, our first place to search for an apartment was Airbnb, where we found that in some cities, like Portland and Los Angeles, you can get a discount of 10-30 percent for booking a month-long stay. We also searched local Facebook groups to see if people were looking to do short-term month-to-month leases on their place.

Before we decided on an apartment, we researched the area to make sure it was safe, had a lot of food options in walking distance and was in the heart of the city so that we could be around the action without having to rent a car 

Get Into the Freelance Game

Though both of us are business owners, we also turned to freelance websites to help us take on additional work in the marketing, writing, business development and social media fields. Earning extra side income helped us pay for things on this adventure that we wouldn’t normally tap into our small pot of disposable income for. This allowed us to go to local museums or attractions and eat at restaurants more frequently than we did when we both had our own kitchen and the proper utensils. We used websites like UpWork, CloudPeeps and Fiverr to find side gigs.

Adam at the airport lugging our stuff to a new city.


Photo Courtesy of Jen Glantz

Adam at the airport lugging our stuff to a new city.

Tap Into Your Friend Network

To help save money along the way, one of the things we did was check in with friends who lived in the cities we wanted to travel to. We asked them to let us know if they had any extended travel plans so that we could house sit their place. We ended up staying at a friend’s has in Austin, for a month, for free, under the terms that we took care of their two dogs, which to us was just an added perk. We also found that our network of friends was able to steer us in the right direction as to what neighborhood we should choose in those cities, the best time of year to plan to live there and the sights we should absolutely see on our monthlong stay and the ones we could ditch.

Travel Lightly

Living out of a carry-on suitcase and one checked-bag size suitcase makes you picky about the clothes you bring with you. I started to realize that I really only wore the same three shirts, four pairs of pants and three dresses. I packed those items plus jackets, shoes and life items (like a mini-hair dryer, a couple of books, rain gear, and my makeup and hair products).

The thing about having fewer things is that you adapt and suddenly, you don’t miss much. Occasionally I’ll think about a top, a sweater or a pair of shoes that I used to keep in the back of my closet and wear once in a while; I do miss being able to get creative with a closet full of clothes. But now, I get creative with the few things I own, and there’s something oddly fun about that.

Living with items that you had to drag around with you every 30 days also leads you to be more conscious about buying new things. When I walk into stores, I now ask myself how badly do I need this item and how much weight will it add to my already 49-pound suitcase? Usually, I leave empty-handed.

Find a New Work-Life Balance

Perhaps the hardest part of living in a new city almost every month is finding a work-life balance that compliments the strong desire to explore what’s around you and to make sure that all of the items on your work to-do list are properly taken care of.

One of the things I did was budget out 2 to 3 hours a day to explore, whether that was early morning, during lunch or at night. I made sure to spend between 8 to 9 hours a day at a desk, a coffee shop or a local co-working space working. That way, I was able to maintain a normal work schedule while also making sure that I was squeezing out every ounce of what a brand new city offers. I did try to implement a “no weekend” work rule, where I’d spend Saturday and Sunday adventuring around town, though of course on busy work weeks, that rule was broken.

Adam and I in Los Angeles, a city we lived in this past winter, surfing on my 30th birthday.


Photo Courtesy of Jen Glantz

Adam and I in Los Angeles, a city we lived in this past winter, surfing on my 30th birthday.

My boyfriend, who has his own marketing company, spends most of his day on the phone and computer, rarely having to meet with clients in person, and when he does, he jumps on a plane (using airline miles) to meet them. I not only run my own wedding business, but I freelance and teach workshops all over the country. When my work calls for me to be in a specific city, I travel there and then come back to the city I’ve parked myself in that month. When I know my work is going to take me to a location for a week or two, we try to plan our traveling and our “city of the month” around that.

My boyfriend and I both worked hard, for years to be able to work for ourselves and work anywhere and we feel proud that we’re able to do that, even though some days the hustle can be hard and the work hours can be extra long.

Traveling like this has put our relationship on an accelerated path. We’ve had to face relationship struggles and problems that other couples might not face for many years in their relationship, dealing with things like living in a new city, again and again, where we both don’t know anyone. We face the stress of having to find creative ways to pay our bills while traveling and work through communicating better ― even when both of us are in a new place we feel uncomfortable in.

But it’s also brought us closer together, having us rely on the strength of our relationship to make “new” feel like “ours” in just a matter of days and learning how to deal with constant change, never settling down. We’ve become great at dealing with life’s curve balls and always being on-the-go, and we look forward to the day when we test our relationship like most do by learning the art of living together in one place, for a long period of time. 

While there is something calming about resting your head on your pillow-top mattress every night and walking around the corner to your favorite bodega for ice cream, there’s also something thrilling about moving around, living out of a suitcase, and understanding that there are far more magical places in this world than New York City.

I don’t know if one of those places will become the place at which I take a new permanent mailing address. That’s to be determined ― however, not for a while. I plan to keep moving around for at least a good chunk of 2019 ― or at least until I get tired of all my clothes being wrinkled.

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Travel & Escape

Lottoland: Here’s why Canadians love it!

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Lotteries have been in existence for many centuries now and it’s an open secret that most people enjoy playing a good lottery.

Asides from gauging your own luck, the thrill of playing, the anticipation of the results and the big wins every now and then is something most people look forward to. Since 1982, the lottery has been in Canada, but now there is a way to play both the Lotto and other international lotteries from Canada, all from the comfort of your home.

With Lottoland, all you need to do is register and get access to numerous international lotteries right from their website. The easy-to-use interface has all the information you need, and great amount of care has been taken to ensure that the online experience is similar—and even better—than if players were to visit each location personally.

The Powerball and Mega Millions lotteries are hitting record highs with their prize money, in what the organizers claim to be the largest jackpot in the history of the world. However, the U.S. has gambling laws that are state controlled and buying your ticket through an online broker can be considered gambling.

“No one except the lottery or their licensed retailers can sell a lottery ticket. No one. Not even us. No one. No, not even that website. Or that one,” Powerball’s website says.

Therefore, to stand a chance to win the $1.5 billion-dollar lottery jackpot it means you have to purchase your lottery tickets directly from a licensed retailer such as Lottoland.

Since 2013, Lottoland has been operating in Canada, rapidly growing in popularity amongst Canadians. Due to its easy of use and instant access to lotteries that were previously considered inaccessible—as Canadians had to travel all the way to the U.S. to purchase tickets in the past—Lottoland has attracted lots of visitors.

Currently, there about 8-million players on Lottoland, a figure that points to the reliability of the website.

One of the core values of Lottoland is transparency and that’s why a quick search on the website would show you a list of all of their winners. Recently, a Lottoland customer was awarded a world-record fee of $137 million CND.

Also, due to the incredibly slim chances of winning the grand prize not everyone would take home mega-dollar winnings, but there are substantial winnings every day.

Securing your information online is usually one important factor when registering on any platform and as the site explains, “Lottoland works very hard to verify your information.”

The site has a multi-verification process that will ensure that you confirm your identity and age before giving you a pay-out. However, in the rare case that a player has immediate luck and wins a lottery before completing the verification process, Lottoland will hold on to the winnings until they complete your verification.

While this might seem like a tedious process, it is very important as these safety features would ensure that your information wasn’t stolen and ultimately your winning routed to another account.

Lottoland is licensed with the National Supervisory Bodies For Lotteries in several countries such as the United Kingdom, Italy, Sweden, Ireland and Australia—where it is called a wagering license. Typically, most gaming companies don’t establish insurance companies as it entails that their activities have to be transparent and the must be highly reputable in the industry.

Nonetheless, Lottoland has no issues meeting up to these standards as they have established themselves as the only gaming sector company who has its own insurance company—an added advantage for new and existing users.

Lotteries aren’t the only games Canadians enjoy playing and Lottoland recognizes this by providing players with other types of gaming. As an industry leader, video designers of online games often make them their first choice when it comes to publishing their works.

Online games such as slots, blackjack, video poker, baccarat, keno, scratchoffs, roulette and many others are always on offer at the Lottoland Casino. There’s also the option of playing with a live dealer and a total of over 100 games.

Lottoland has received numerous rave reviews from its growing list of satisfied customer and their responsive customer service agents are always available to answer any questions users may have, along with solving challenges they may have encountered.

More and more Canadians are trooping to Lottoland in droves due to the unique experience of going to a casino without having to leave the comfort of their homes.

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Travel & Escape

Dealing with baggage on your trip

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(NC)Nothing is more embarrassing than having to unpack your baggage at the airport. It’s common to overpack because you want to make sure you have everything you need for your trip – the right shoes, a jacket in case it’s cold, a bathing suit in case there’s a pool. But you must be mindful of the baggage restrictions. So, how can you be smart with your baggage when travelling?

The first thing to do is talk to your TICO-certified travel agent about the weight restrictions and number of bags you are allowed to take. Some airlines charge per bag, while others may offer one bag for free depending on weight.

You’ll also need to know if there are security requirements for carry-on and checked baggage. For example, there may be prohibited items such as gels and liquids. These limitations vary from airline to airline and depends on if your flight is international or domestic, so you’ll need to check the policy of the airline you’re travelling with.

Naturally, you want to avoid incurring baggage fees, so talk to your travel agent, or contact the airline directly. You can also visit their website to review the luggage policy.

Here are a few more tips to help you manage your baggage when travelling:

  • Clearly label all baggage with your name, home address, and contact information
  • Place an identification tag inside the baggage in case the outside tag is torn off
  • Lock bags with CATSA/ACTSA travel locks
  • Put a colourful ribbon or other identifying marks on your bags so they are easily recognizable
  • Carry valuables in your hand luggage; jewelry, money, medications, important documents, etc.

You can’t carry everything with you, so be smart when you pack. Take only necessary items and focus on your trip.

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Travel & Escape

What travellers need to know if a destination wedding is cancelled

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(NC) It’s two weeks before you’re scheduled to attend a destination wedding and then you get the call. The wedding has been called off.

Sure, you’re upset for the couple, but now you’re faced with plane tickets and hotel reservations. So, what can you do?

There’s no reason why you can’t go and enjoy the trip, but bear in mind you may face a price increase, especially if this was part of a group booking. Group bookings often include a minimum number of travellers to get the discounted price, as well as terms and conditions regarding changes or cancellations.

You could ask other travellers to come along to keep the group discount. But name changes often count as cancellations based on the terms of the vacation package and premium charges may apply. If you booked with a TICO-registered travel agency, website or tour company, it’s better to contact them and ask about options before making any decisions.

While it’s devastating for the couple who planned the destination wedding, the fact is that the cancellation affects all the confirmed guests. So, it’s important to know your options so you can salvage an unfortunate situation. Always book with a TICO-registered travel agency, website or tour operator so you can circle back and find out what they can do for you.

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