Connect with us

Buzz

These before and after photos are a testament to the power of home staging

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]







Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

Who doesn’t love a before and after reveal? For the reader, it’s instant gratification, but behind the scenes, it’s all blood, sweat and tears. We asked Red Barrinuevo, President and Principal Home Stager of Redesign4more, to pull back the curtain on the home staging process. Here he shares photos from five recent projects and explains how he won over prospective homebuyers with style and functionality.

1. Luxury townhouse in the Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, listed at $2.2 million, sold in one month













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

Red Barrinuevo: This is a four-level townhome with an elevator. It’s almost 4,000 square feet and fronts the beach. The owners didn’t really know how to set it up, the whole house was just a mix of everything. This space was supposed to be for living and dining, but it’s hard to tell because there’s so much furniture. You can barely see the fireplace because there’s a piano right in front of it. We chose to move the piano closer to the balcony, which helped to better define the space.

With a property like this, you’re selling the view as well — it’s like having a vacation home just minutes from downtown Toronto. We pushed the drapes to either side in order to showcase the view and bring in more natural light. We also changed the layout by floating the furniture in the middle of the room to make it feel more cozy and intimate.













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

RB: This is the master bedroom of the same home, but it wasn’t used just for sleeping — the owner did everything here! There’s exercise equipment, a desk, and toys for his nieces and nephews. We needed to showcase it as a bedroom and nothing else. The room had a lot of luxurious features, like custom drapery, a fireplace, big screen TV and oversized windows, but you couldn’t really tell.

We also needed to break up all the browns. We had a wood bed, a leather bench and a wood built-in media console, so we introduced pattern and brought in a lighter area rug. We added a blueish-grey bedspread and matching accent chairs, too.

2. Detached single-family home in the Cabbagetown neighborhood of Toronto, listed at $1.75 million, sold in 45 days













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

RB: This is an older Victorian home with a long and skinny layout. It’s open-concept, so the dining room flows into the living room. The furniture pieces that you see in the before photo came from the condo the couple owned before they purchased this house. The dining set was way too small for the room. We picked out bigger furniture pieces and changed the light fixture to one that was more appropriately sized. It’s super functional and brightens up the whole space.

This table is also extendable; it can seat up to eight people. We placed the head chairs on either side of the console, but those can be used for extra seating. This allows a potential buyer to see that the room could accommodate large groups for dinner parties or family meals.

We revarnished the hardwood flooring, which was not very expensive. It doesn’t involve buffing — it’s a chemical application that only takes about half a day to complete. It looks flawless and reflects a lot of light from the front of the house.

3. Condominium in Old Toronto, listed at $1.9 million, sold in one week over asking













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

RB: This is a two-bedroom plus den, two bath condo. The homeowners were in their early 60s. To sell this condo we knew that it had to look sexy. They had the space, but the furniture pieces were wrong. The back of the couch was almost touching the kitchen counter, and there was no flow.

We brought in a new couch and placed it over by the window. You’re still able to enjoy the view — the profile is low and there’s another seating area adjacent to it. For the color palette, we decided to use mostly white with a few pops of color in the cushions and artwork. It made the space more luxurious and modern.

4. Detached home in the Scarborough borough of Toronto, interior styling project













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

RB: This is a detached home located in Scarborough near the Bluffs. My clients had recently purchased it and wanted me to style the master bedroom. I often have repeat customers who hire me to stage a home for sale, and then when they move into their new place they want me to set that one up, too. It allows them to really enjoy the space they’re currently living in.

For this master bedroom, I kept the bed they had already purchased — it works well in this space. Their old nightstands were from IKEA and far too small for this bedroom. The homeowners wanted the color palette to be all grey, but to make it more interesting I looked for pieces with pattern, such as as the mirror, area rug and lamps. We played with texture, too, you’ll notice the velvet ottoman, silk drapes and the shimmery light fixture.

5. Semi-detached home in the Summerhill neighborhood of Toronto, sold in two days, $125,000 over asking













Photo by WBM, designed by Redesign4more

RB: The owners of this home really loved plants — there were plants everywhere! As much as I like to incorporate plants, they were just eating up too much floor space, so we removed them.

The table in this dining room was too small and it was pushed up against the wall. They also had a buffet table on one side that was also taking up a lot of much-needed space. We decided to remove the buffet table and move the dining table back into the center of the room.

We were able to squeeze in a skinny glass console on the left side and placed two lamps on top of it, which made a huge difference. There wasn’t a chandelier in this space, so we needed to add more light. A lot of potential buyers will tour homes in the evening after work, so you have to prevent the spaces from looking too dark. In this dining room, we kept the existing wall color and window treatments, but used the lamps and mirrors to increase the amount of light.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Buzz

New home? Prepare for the unexpected

Editor

Published

on

By

(NC) Buying a house, getting married or having your first baby are all major life events that are likely to affect your finances. But whether you’re in the midst of a major life event or not, it’s important to check in on your finances regularly to maintain good financial health.

Your financial health encompasses things like your spending, savings, borrowing and future financial plans. It also means dedicating a set amount of savings for unexpected future events. It can even include optional credit protection insurance, such as TD protection plans, to help cover your debt balances in case of death, a covered critical illness or total disability.

Even though it can be tough to think about the unexpected, life is unpredictable and it’s important to plan for the unexpected. Find more information at td.com.

Continue Reading

Buzz

Mortgage pitfalls to avoid

Editor

Published

on

By

(NC) Throughout life, you may have moments where you’ll make a large purchase or invest in a costly item, like your family home. But whether you’re in the market for your first new property or already have a mortgage, leaving this asset unprotected can be costly.   

Insuring your housing financial debt, as well as debt for other big-ticket items like a new boat for your lakefront cottage or keepsake jewelry like an engagement ring, is a smart investment in your well-being.

To help protect your debt balances like a mortgage, your bank may have optional credit protection insurance products.

“Your home is one of your biggest assets, yet illness can happen at any stage of life. Worrying about your mortgage when the focus should be on health isn’t a situation anyone would wish for,” explains Shirley Malloy, vice president at TD. “Fortunately, we offer mortgage protection to provide coverage for your outstanding balance should you face a covered critical health event.”

Mortgage protection can be purchased whether you’re in the process of applying for a mortgage or already have a home financing solution. But what about protection options for credit card debt?

“Given the unprecedented circumstances of this year, many Canadians are trying to plan for the unexpected to protect themselves and their finances,” says Malloy. “TD balance protection plus is an optional product designed to help you deal with your credit card payment obligations in the event of a covered event, such as loss of employment.”

Continue Reading

Buzz

Is your internet too slow? It’s probably not you

Editor

Published

on

By

(NC) We all know the aggravation of a school lesson that just won’t stop freezing or the family video call that looks more like a photo montage. And, as we adjust to the impact of COVID-19 on our day-to-day, that slow connection can have frustrating consequences.

Working from home and learning remotely, both need fast, stable internet, something not enough Canadians have yet. Even if you have fast devices in your home, if the infrastructure in your area is not optimal, your connection won’t be either.

Right now, cities have the infrastructure needed to ensure access. But rural and remote communities are hugely underserved, with fewer than half having high-speed internet, and fewer than a third of households on reservations have high-speed connections.

Fortunately, change is coming. The Universal Broadband Fund is backing projects across Canada right now to ensure the reliable, high-speed internet connections families need to work, study, access services online, and safely stay in touch with each other.

The fund existed before COVID, but as a response to the pandemic, its timetable has been moved up by four years to a target of 98 per cent of Canadians with high-speed internet access by 2026. With the faster pace, at least 90 per cent of us should be connected by the end of 2021.

The fund is focused on improvements in rural and remote communities across Canada to fix the disconnect between internet access for urban and rural households.  This means more remote work opportunities, better access to remote learning and safer access to healthcare, no matter where you live.

It’s not just for good connections at home, either. The improvements mean much better access to mobile networks on highways between remote communities. The result is better, safer navigation and access to emergency services for your family, even on the road in the middle of nowhere. Mobile projects will be focused on serving Indigenous communities and the roads leading to them.

The shape these improvements will take in your area will depend on where you live. Canada is huge, and its communities are hugely diverse, with diverse needs. Keep an eye out for local projects — they’re a small part of something much bigger.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending